CNE 2019: The origins of the traditional kavanagh drum

Trudy Wright (pictured) became a professional drummer after years of struggling with mental health The kavanagh is a traditional Indigenous technique through which people sound a note, make a pattern, or pronounce vowel sounds….

CNE 2019: The origins of the traditional kavanagh drum

Trudy Wright (pictured) became a professional drummer after years of struggling with mental health

The kavanagh is a traditional Indigenous technique through which people sound a note, make a pattern, or pronounce vowel sounds.

It was invented hundreds of years ago by people living in south-western Queensland, and speaks to an almost mythical relationship between the ground and the noise it creates, via its wave form, of song.

A Traditional story about the kavanagh

– Octaviz and Oxha 6.. On 12 August, Octaviz and Oxha came on a horse, after which the plane departed. – Aired drummed a tune and said to Oxha, “When the plane returns, I’m going to eat.” – Oxha got out of the horse, made a tune, and said to Octaviz, “For you never heard of a kavanagh. I’ve made one from my soul for you.” – Octaviz said, “I don’t want you to starve to death.” – Oxha asked Octaviz, “Did your wife rape you?” – Octaviz said, “Yes.” – Oxha said, “I didn’t ask for that.” – Octaviz said, “Ours is a different sort of kavanagh, because she was the first.” – Octaviz asked, “Will you eat with me?” Oxha said, “Yes.” – Octaviz said, “I don’t know.” – Oxha said, “No, it’s my last meal.” – Octaviz said, “Stay with me.” – Oxha made a tune. – Octaviz made a tune. – Oxha said, “No, it’s my last meal.” – Octaviz said, “It’s not. You’re not supposed to die until you’re no longer dependent on me.” – Octaviz said, “If you tell me you want to leave, I’ll go.” – Oxha said, “I don’t want to leave.” – Octaviz said, “I can’t leave you anymore.” – Oxha said, “No. I don’t want to leave you.” – Octaviz said, “How do you leave me?” – Oxha said, “I will leave you without you.” – Octaviz said, “You will go. You have to die with your soul.” – Oxha said, “No, I will leave you with the spirit.” – Octaviz said, “That’s hard for me.” – Oxha said, “We’ll have to talk.” – Octaviz said, “What’s that word I’ve learned?” – Oxha said, “End.” – Octaviz said, “End. That means it’s too late.” – Oxha said, “You may have to make an apology to that child, so it will be completed.” – Octaviz said, “Oh my God, that’s terrible.” – Oxha said, “That’s awful.” – Octaviz said, “That’s terrible.” – Oxha said, “You’ve got to stop.” – Octaviz said, “What? You’ve got to stop this?” – Oxha said, “This is where I went.” – Octaviz said, “I think I will give you permission to leave.” – Oxha said, “Yes.” – Octaviz said, “You might be able to go.” – Oxha said, “Yes.” – Octaviz said, “No.” – Oxha said, “I have to go.” – Octaviz said, “Let’s go.” – Oxha said, “That’s awful.” – Octaviz said, “I can’t do that.” – Oxha said, “That’s terrible.” – Octaviz said, “It’s terrible.” – Octaviz said

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