Medici painting ‘created two centuries before Leonardo Da Vinci’

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption The Leonardo Da Vinci painting sparked a 14-hour auction on 17 November 2015 Scientific experts at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York have cast fresh doubt…

Medici painting 'created two centuries before Leonardo Da Vinci'

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption The Leonardo Da Vinci painting sparked a 14-hour auction on 17 November 2015

Scientific experts at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York have cast fresh doubt on the authenticity of a painting sold for $450m (£340m) in November 2015.

The historic painting, now called The Salvator Mundi, is by the Italian Renaissance artist Leonardo da Vinci.

It was sold for $450m at Christie’s auction in New York. It was then withdrawn from the Sotheby’s auction because of complaints by the other sellers.

But last year it reappeared on the market, raising more questions.

Experts and art historians argue that the painting has several common traits with works by Da Vinci, who died in 1519.

Scans

Art historians the Art Dealers Association of America have also claimed that the painting was painted two centuries before The Salvator Mundi was finished.

As recently as last week, the Swiss art collector Carla Herranz, who owned the painting, said it had been commissioned by King Louis XIV of France.

“The claim that the painting is by Leonardo Da Vinci, and not a copy is spurious and baseless,” said Pascal Marcouel, vice-president of the Art Dealers Association of America.

The painting was designed to go on show at the Louvre, Paris, in 1719, but was never completed.

Around 15 paintings of the “Salvator Mundi” are believed to be owned by the Louvre, but it is not known exactly how many versions there are.

Earlier this year experts cast doubts on a painting thought to be a full-length version of Leonardo’s Mona Lisa, created in 1503 and sold for $300m.

In January, a London gallery backed out of auctioning another Leonardo painting, after experts said they could not be sure it was a genuine “Sleeping Lady”.

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