Sudan military gives Nawras al-Rajoub back his job

Image copyright EPA Image caption Abdelrahim Osman is one of the six men who overthrew Sudan’s president in a failed coup Sudan’s military has reinstated the country’s prime minister, Omar al-Bashir, who was sacked…

Sudan military gives Nawras al-Rajoub back his job

Image copyright EPA Image caption Abdelrahim Osman is one of the six men who overthrew Sudan’s president in a failed coup

Sudan’s military has reinstated the country’s prime minister, Omar al-Bashir, who was sacked in a coup attempt last month.

Mr Bashir sacked Nawras al-Rajoub, who was appointed in 2016, after his appointment.

Six men overthrew the Sudanese leader last month, demanding the resignation of the country’s army chief.

After the coup was put down, Mr Bashir re-appointed army chief Awad Ali Hussein as interim leader.

Image copyright EPA Image caption Sudan’s military also reinstated the country’s defence minister

Sudan has been in a state of political and economic crisis for years.

Last month, the head of the United Nations was in Khartoum to push the government to reform, in a two-day visit.

But Mr Hussein has not acted to stop a brutal crackdown on critics and the media, reports the BBC’s Alex Thompson in Khartoum.

Image copyright EPA Image caption Mr Rajoub has been reappointed Sudan’s prime minister

“President Bashir has reversed his decision to remove Nawras al-Rajoub, which was an embarrassment for the former minister,” our correspondent says.

Mr Bashir has been in power since 1989 and there have been previous armed uprisings against him.

He recently said he would not rule out another presidential bid in 2020.

Last month’s coup bid was accompanied by anger over the sanctions imposed on Sudan by Western nations.

Banks have recently been hit by withdrawals, leading to power shortages in the country.

Image copyright EPA Image caption Last month’s coup failed and Sudan’s dictator was reinstated

Senior International Monetary Fund figures who visited the country last week insisted the government and the central bank tackle the cash shortages.

The group told Reuters news agency that Central Bank of Sudan Governor Omar Dahab was among those who went missing after a failed coup attempt.

Several of the ousted leaders were captured after a shootout with the security forces, and nearly 150 people were killed.

The three-hour-long clash took place in the capital, Khartoum, and saw a tank dumped on a building after gunmen went on the rampage in the streets, although the army said its troops had killed dozens of people.

In Washington, State Department spokesman Robert Palladino told reporters the coup attempt was a “deadly escalation of violence and a dangerous setback to the Sudanese people’s aspirations”.

What is Sudan’s military?

Image copyright EPA Image caption Six people attempted to overthrow Sudan’s President Bashir last month

Unlike in Egypt and Libya, the Sudanese military is not run by a president who declares loyalty to the military.

But it still has the power to remove or appoint military leaders and the thousands of officers are used to running the country.

Sudan’s small and heavily armed defence forces are usually loyal to Bashir.

Image copyright EPA Image caption Sudan’s military operates like a general and chiefs of staff, with the general in charge

More than 1,000 officers took part in the coup attempt.

They gave orders to the army chief of staff, Gen Ali al-Omar, according to a spokesman for the group, who called himself General Al-Issa al-Muqaddam.

He said the six men who attempted the coup included mid-level commanders and were led by “military officers who were sidelined in the military structure and found no place in the new government”.

Sudanese media has reported that the six men were rewarded with cash and cars.

Gen Hussein was declared interim head of state, along with the defence minister and a former chief of staff, while the military met to discuss the government’s crisis.

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