When the TV icon in your living room isn’t your TV star

Home | Russell Crowe stars in this documentary about iconic marine biologist Jacques Cousteau. Things to Do This Weekend! Becoming Cousteau ★★★☆☆ For many children of the ’70s, it would have been impossible to…

When the TV icon in your living room isn’t your TV star

Home | Russell Crowe stars in this documentary about iconic marine biologist Jacques Cousteau.

Things to Do This Weekend!

Becoming Cousteau

★★★☆☆

For many children of the ’70s, it would have been impossible to grow up in that decade without hearing the famous words of Jacques Cousteau: “So many houses in the world don’t have windows, and the only windows in the world are those that we see with our own eyes.” It’s a quote that could have been hurled on anything he said, but one that stands out when it’s flipped and used to describe the demimonde of celebrity culture now and at any given moment. It’s hard to ignore the words ‘’If we keep the oceans close to our hearts we can easily continue our family and win.’” This documentary follows the 84-year-old designer, explorer and conservationist as he fights for our oceans and what’s left of their ecosystems, fighting against deeper environmental crises around the world.

+ Meg Mac

>> John Lowe’s “Studious Memory”

★★★☆☆

There are very few directors who could stage an operatic three hour setting as warm and comfy as this one. Porter appears beside some very competent singers on paper who do their utmost to make everything not feel like a standard opera. There’s a structural route to be taken here that simplifies things by making the story about Porter the author of songs. And I don’t regret reading that early on, since things have certainly become more about the singers than the characters they are portraying.

+ Robin Heading

Concerto for piano and string orchestra

★★★☆☆

The founder of the Georgia King Singers, widely regarded as one of the finest women’s ensembles in the world, presents her latest work. I didn’t expect to be immediately drawn into it — until I heard it felt remarkably current, and a bold, fresh combination of texture and spirit that belies its respectable age.

+ Keith Brooks

The Search for Jupiter and his Moonset: 1921-1935

★★★☆☆

An engrossing and startlingly well-crafted history of the first U.S. manned space flight. Charles Head’s 1883 book, “The Search for Jupiter” was pivotal in the early years of U.S. history in several ways: it laid the groundwork for the team of rich and apolitical sleuths called the Famous Men of Science; it revealed how Apollo was going to work; and it served as a blueprint for landing missions for NASA which was created in its wake.

+ Philip Bode

Coming attractions

“Becoming Cousteau,” IFC, 7 p.m. Thursday | Dariusha-Lu Rivera

Percussionists Manto Cruz Guerrero and Omar Robles perform with the Harlem Symphony Orchestra in a program that includes Bruch’s Concerto for Two Pianos with Percussion.

“The Search for Jupiter and His Moonset: 1921-1935,” SPET *., 9 p.m. Friday | Piano Recital Hall, 7 p.m. Saturday | Memorial Presbyterian Church, 8 p.m. Sept. 18

Roughly 88 years after his death, classical icon Ray Charles has been reassessed in this riveting, revealing documentary from the BBC.

**Rating subject to change

*= Supervised

**+Labeled as PG

*****+Labeled as Unrated

*****+Labeled as Not Rated

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