Facebook edited content to reflect happy faces in countries where users were less likely to click, report says

A new leaked internal Facebook document suggests the social network is less likely to purify malicious content in user-friendly settings than it is in less populous regions such as a small group of West…

Facebook edited content to reflect happy faces in countries where users were less likely to click, report says

A new leaked internal Facebook document suggests the social network is less likely to purify malicious content in user-friendly settings than it is in less populous regions such as a small group of West Coast locales.

The new post-scrubbing rates reveal a new, critical aspect of the controversy rocking Facebook, as officials examine whether the Menlo Park, Calif.-based company kept its data-privacy policies in check enough.

The document was provided to Motherboard by two Facebook employees, and the publication doesn’t have much information about how the staff decided to release it. “We have tried to keep the content of the documents confidential,” spokeswoman Helen Lux wrote in an e-mail. “However, one of our employees shared the document with a reporter outside of Facebook over the course of the last week, out of concern for our teams’ privacy and security.”

The document details Facebook’s policies on “de-facto abuse moderation,” in which a “possible abuse” might include public comments about a topic and Facebook employees’ likes to particular pages. Facebook’s global user base is just 2.23 billion, compared with 631 million in the Philippines.

The new film was published days after Facebook released its first ever transparency report, making public the total number of government requests for user data around the world. Countries from Mexico to New Zealand expressed concern over security measures, most focused on the social network’s use of facial recognition technology. (Facebook said that it fully complies with government data requests.)

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